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Welcome.

 

I am a photographer. Some of my work can be viewed on this website. Enjoy!

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The Balloon


The Balloon


"monstrous pourings"

"harp"

XXXXXXX "certain contrasts with darker portions"

"inner joy"

"large, square corners"

"conservative eclecticism that has so far governed modern balloon design"

:::::: "abnormal vigor"

"warm soft lazy passages"

"Has unity been sacrificed for a sprawling quality?"

"Quelle catastrophe!"

"munching"

 

~

 

extract from 'The Balloon' by Donald Barthelme

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Walking off the Map


Walking off the Map


"In 1920, when it was first made public that an expedition would be launched to climb Everest, there was an outcry at the prospect that the entire surface of the globe was to be filled in. 'It will be a proud moment for the man who first stands on the top of the earth,' lamented an editorial in the Daily News, 'but he will have the painful thought that he had queered the pitch for posterity. For my part, I should like to think that some corner of the globe would be preserved for ever inviolate. Men will never lose the sense of wonder, but they will always try to do so, and such a sanctuary would have a world wide effect.' The Evening News took a much stronger line, declaring that 'Some of the last mystery of the world will pass when the last secret place in it, the naked peak of Everest, shall be trodden by those trespassers.'

Precisely the same worry at the dwindling of the unknown has dogged our own era. 'The surface of the globe,' wrote the explorer Wilfred Thesiger in his autobiography, The Life of My Choice, 'having now, thanks to the internal combustion engine, been thoroughly explored, no longer affords scope for the adventurous individual in search of the unknown.' It is not only the movement of individuals which destroys the unknown, of course, but the movement of information. The global information networks which have been established during the past century - the internet foremost among them - mean that almost nothing remains unrepresented in some medium or other. At the click of a mouse we can summon up images, verbal or visual, of almost anything we wish for. There seems barely any room left for the unknown or the original. So we, like the Victorians before us, have taken steps to relocate the unknown. We have displaced our concept of it upwards and outwards, on to space - that notoriously final frontier - and inwards and downwards, to the innermost chambers of atom and gene, or the recesses of the human psyche: what George Eliot called 'the unmapped country within us'."

extract from 'Mountains of the Mind' by Robert Macfarlane

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Contact


Contact


Feel free to contact me about anything your heart desires.

Sometimes I have zines and prints for sale.

 

Email: joe@josefball.com